Psychology Class teaches about the teenage brain

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Psychology Class teaches about the teenage brain

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One of the many electives offered at the school is psychology. The human brain is very complex, and it can help anyone to know about how it works. 

“This class teaches you how to recognize your learned patterns of behavior so you can exercise your personal freedom to choose your response to any situation,” Robert Sims, a teacher of psychology, said. “I don’t have a most fascinating thing I’ve learned because it all works together. Psychology is a big puzzle of biology, learning, and social interaction.” 

It’s especially important for teenagers. There is a lot of things happening to the teenage brain, and they don’t always have someone that they can talk to, so knowing what is going on can give guidance.

“As teens it is important to know how the brain works, why you feel the way you do,” senior Cassady Zwahlen said.

It is also good for understanding others. Studying the mind can teach people about behaviors that people do when dealing with a certain emotion or struggle, so that they can recognize it. This can help clear up misunderstandings or better communication by sparking a conversation. 

“It’s made me realize that other people go through a lot of what I do, and there could be psychological reasons why they act the way they do,” Zwahlen said. 

Psychology isn’t only useful for becoming a therapist, it can aid in many other careers as well.

“I am interested in how people’s minds work to what makes them do what they do,” senior Bethany Jenson said. “I thought it would be helpful for my future career, nursing. There is so much that affects how a person behaves.”

Everyone should learn about psychology in some way, even if it is just a five-minute video because it is always good to have knowledge of others and ourselves.

“Psychology is awesome because it teaches us why we do what we do, and how to improve ourselves,” said Sims. “It’s helping us to create an owner’s manual for being human.”

Those interested in this elective can enroll with their counselor.

 

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